Archive for the ‘sculpture’ Category

Opening for ‘Core Values’ and ‘Ground Form’ Installations

Sunday, June 28th, 2015

On Saturday, June 13 we held an Opening for my ‘Core Values’ and ‘Ground Form’ installations at the Aidron Duckworth Museum in Meriden, New Hampshire. For me, the piece was a meditation on our society’s inaction on climate change, as well as a meditation on color and form. It was gratifying to have some 50 people attend the event. Many thanks to Museum Trustee Grace W. Harde for having made the event possible and to Colleen Bozuwa for having produced the above video of the Opening.

I am equally grateful to Tracy Penfield and Lucia Gagliardone who offered an improvised dance performance among the installations. The dance was conducted in silence to focus our attention on the piece in that moment. So we all heard birds, car alarms and the occasional motorcycle. It was wonderful to see the piece surrounded by people responding to the color and forms through dance, a child climbing, people throwing frisbees and others engaged in quiet contemplation.

Comments I heard from attendees included:

I don’t consider myself artistic. For me art is a new way of thinking about things that are foreign to me. It’s just a cool way of thinking about things. My perception of artists is that they have a need to express themselves. What I get out of it is another perspective that is new and different and appreciated. It leaves me in awe because I don’t do that naturally.

And:

How wonderful, Jay! I loved the colors, the shapes, the way they relate to one another, the grace of the dancers, the green setting… The whole presentation calls up a peaceful, thought-provoking mindset. Thank you for sharing your work with us.

Upcoming Exhibitions

Monday, May 25th, 2015

Ground Form and Core Values, 2

Aidron Duckworth Museum Installations

I have an opening at the Aidron Duckworth Museum in Meriden, New Hampshire on Saturday, June 13 from 3-6pm. I have installed the polychromatic “Core Values” which is a meditation on our society’s inaction around climate change, as well as “Ground Form.” Both employ many painted saplings, above, which will be on the grounds of the Museum through 1 November. Learn more here.

SculptureFest

I will likely be creating something new for SculptureFest this year, which opens on Labor Day at King Farm, Woodstock, Vermont. I will also probably be showing work in collaboration with an artist collective known as “ECO-visions.” Learn more here.

Looking forward to seeing many of you in Meriden and Woodstock!

“Elemental” Installation at SculptureFest

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Elemental Collage

Elemental Collage 2

I installed this piece called “Elemental” for SculptureFest 2014 in Woodstock, Vermont. The Opening for the King Farm section was on 30 August. I took old doors and painted earth, air, fire and water elements on them. They are set in the cardinal points: north is earth, east is air, south is fire and west is water. The reflective stone is the center of the piece. It’s made of mosaic broken mirror. The doors are set 12 feet (4 meters) in the air and are spaced 30 feet (10 meters). The space they define has a ritual quality to it.

Keynote and “The Waste Stream:” Earth Day at Humboldt State University

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

For Earth Day, I was invited to Humboldt State University in Arcata, California to deliver a keynote address on my “Art of Sustainability” approach and to co-create an installation with students to raise awareness about the plastics flowing through our lives (and into the ocean). I am grateful to organizers and to the Humboldt Energy Independence Fund for making my participation possible.

You can download and view my keynote presentation here: Humboldt Keynote, Jay Mead, April 2014.

“The Waste Stream”

Waste Stream, 2

Waste Stream, 1

“The Waste Stream” installation simulates plastic waste flowing westward into the Pacific Ocean, where there is a monstrous mass of plastic accumulating in something known as the “Pacific Gyre.” The installation was created in a few hours and is kinetic in that the wind moved the five long tentacles of bottle chains. Some 1,500 bottles make up this piece, which stretches a few hundred feet and flows down two sets of stairs.

I liked the fact that it was sprawling on the ground and forced people to notice what was happening and where they were walking. Most folks stepped over the strands carefully while others – like skate boarders – saw it as something to have fun with and jump over.

The folks who stopped by and talked to me about the project engaged in varying degrees of conversation from light to deep, including talk of complex systems going into political, religious, cultural and even evolutionary roots. One participant commented:

“You touched on a question that has been on my mind: How can art activate memories that remind us of how we are connected to this planet?  Once that awareness is activated, turning it into engagement, is the big challenge if we are to move from being passive observers to participants in making our human presence more sustainable.”

I really enjoy engaging with people as I co-create a large piece. It’s wonderful to begin the day of creation not knowing how it will turn out, but having faith and then being pleasantly surprised to discover new aspects such as the role of the wind.

Architecture Class at The Sharon Academy

Monday, March 17th, 2014

I recently had the opportunity to teach an elective Architecture class at The Sharon Academy in Sharon, Vermont. Each of the 8 students completed two projects, one based in fantasy, the other in reality. The first was to design and build a model of a fantasy tree house. The second was to design an artist-in-residence cabin for possible construction on The Sharon Academy campus. Students visited the future site for the cabin to plan a residence footprint no bigger than 800 square feet. Then, they generated drawings and models of their proposed cabins and presented them to classmates, a visiting architect and school administrators:

Through an exciting collaboration with the Harpo Foundation, the school may draw inspiration from the students’ designs to build the actual cabin!

Thanks to Amber Wylie for her photography and slideshow video!